Home News National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, A. Philip Randolph Institute and National Council of Negro Women Join Together to Commend AT&T’s “It Can Wait” Initiative
National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, A. Philip Randolph Institute and National Council of Negro Women Join Together to Commend AT&T’s “It Can Wait” Initiative
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National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, A. Philip Randolph Institute and National Council of Negro Women Join Together to Commend AT&T’s “It Can Wait” Initiative

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Renewed Push to Stop Texting and Driving By AT&T Seen as “Positive Measure”

Washington D.C. – Beginning today, AT&T will step-up their efforts to stop the dangerous and deadly activity of texting and driving by encouraging drivers to be responsible and sign a pledge on the website www.itcanwait.com. Noting that this positive, much-needed measure will help to limit the increasing number of accidents stemming from distracted drivers, the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP), A. Philip Randolph Institute (APRI), and the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) have joined together to praise AT&T’s ““It Can Wait” Initiative:

“With thousands of accidents every year injuring countless people, we need to put a stop to texting while driving. By asking individuals to take responsibility for their actions, and signing a pledge on its website, AT&T is being a leader in this space and shining a light on a difficult topic,” said Clayola Brown, president and CEO of APRI. “Although it may seem like an urgent message, It Can Wait until you get to your destination.”

Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, executive director of NCNW, “We are pleased with this effort made by AT&T. As a community-based organization, NCNW sees the benefit from informing families and youths of irresponsible behavior and how we can work together to change it. Texting while driving has become a serious issue and we encourage our members to be vigilant against the practice.”

Agreeing with Brown and Jones-DeWeever, Melanie Campbell, president and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP) adds, “Adoption of mobile technology and applications stemming from those devices has increased sharply in the past few years, especially in communities of color. Texting is a part of everyday life but it is important that we maintain our safety and the safety of others while communicating.” Campbell continues, “Answering a text or call is not worth the risk of losing your life, or endangering the lives of others on the road.”

For more information or to join the movement to save lives and stop texting while driving visit www.itcanwait.com.

About
National Coalition on Black Civic Participation Founded in 1976, the NCBCP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to increasing African American participation in civil society. The current programs and initiatives of the organization include Black Youth Vote!, Black Women’s Roundtable, a Black Men & Boys Initiative and the Unity 2012 Voter Empowerment Campaign. The National Coalition has trained and engaged African American leaders and community activists in overcoming institutional barriers that have hindered the growth of Black communities politically, socially and economically. For more information visit www.ncnw.org.

A.Phillip Randolph Institute The A. Philip Randolph Institute is the oldest AFL-CIO Constituency Group. It has 141 chapters in 32 States. August 1-5 in Oakland California, APRI held an educational conference focusing on health and health disparities. It attracted more than 800 participants, mostly black workers and union members.

National Council of Negro Women The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) is a council of national African American women’s organizations and community-based sections. Founded in 1935, the NCNW mission is to lead, develop, and advocate for women of African descent as they support their families and communities. NCNW fulfills this purpose through research, advocacy, and national and community-based services and programs on issues of health, education, and economic empowerment in the United States and Africa. With its 39 national affiliates and more than 200 sections, NCNW is a 501(c)3 organization with an outreach to nearly four million women. For more information about NCNW, please call (202) 737 0120, or visit www.ncnw.org.