Home Entertainment The Greatest of All Time, Muhammad Ali, Dead at 74
The Greatest of All Time, Muhammad Ali, Dead at 74
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The Greatest of All Time, Muhammad Ali, Dead at 74

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By By Kevin Iole, Yahoo – Muhammad Ali, the eloquent, colorful, controversial and brilliant three-time heavyweight boxing champion who was known as much for his social conscience and staunch opposition to the Vietnam War as for his dazzling boxing skills, died Friday.
He was 74.

Once the most outrageous trash talker in sports, he was largely muted for the last quarter century of his life, quieted by a battle with Parkinson’s Disease.

Born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. on Jan. 17, 1942, in Louisville, Ky., Ali learned to box after his bicycle was stolen when he was 12 years old. When young Clay vowed to “whoop the behind” of the thief, a local police officer encouraged him to learn to box to channel his energy.

He would go on to become known as “The Greatest,” and at his peak in the 1970s was among the most recognizable faces on Earth.

He was known for his tendency to recite poems while making predictions about his fights – “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. The hands can’t hit what the eyes can’t see.” – as well as for giving opponents often unflattering nicknames. He referred to Sonny Liston as “the big ugly bear,” George Chuvalo as “The Washerwoman,” Floyd Patterson as “The Rabbit” and Earnie Shavers as “The Acorn.”

But his most controversial, and some would say cruel, nicknames were reserved for his fiercest rival, Joe Frazier. He first dubbed Frazier “Uncle Tom” and then later called him “The Gorilla.”

When Ali prepared to meet Frazier for a third time in Manila, Philippines, on Oct. 1, 1975, he frequently carried a toy rubber gorilla with him. At one news conference, he pulled the gorilla out of his pocket and began punching it as he said, “It’s going to be a killa and a thrilla and a chilla when I get the gorilla in Manila.”

Frazier, though, took it personally and harbored a decades-long grudge.

“It sure did bother him,” Gene Kilroy, Ali’s friend for more than 50 years, told Yahoo Sports.

Kilroy said Ali was simply promoting the fights and meant no harm, and said Ali regretted the impact his words had upon Frazier.

“I used to tell Ali, ‘Someday, me, you and Joe are going to be three old men sitting in the park laughing about all that [expletive],’ ” Kilroy recalled. “And Ali said, ‘That would be great!’ I talked to Joe and Joe said, ‘No, [expletive] him. I don’t want to be with him.’ But he loosened up later and they mended fences. Read the full story at Yahoo.com